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UPDATE: Partition falls on young girl at Gwinn High School

UPDATE, 9/4/15: Police say they received notification around 6:15 a.m. Friday that four-year-old Amarah Filizetti passed away from her injuries received in the accident in Gwinn High School Thursday. The investigation into the accident is ongoing. The family of Amarah asks for privacy at this time. __________ GWINN, MI-- A four-year-old girl has been seriously injured in an accident at Gwinn High School. Forsyth Township Police say Thursday around 10:15 a.m. they were called to the high...
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Meth dump found in Alger County cemetery

MUNISING, MI-- A meth dump site has been found in Munising. City Police say the site was discovered around 8 a.m. Thursday on the southern end of Maple Grove Cemetery. The Upper Peninsula Substance Enforcement Team was called in to gather evidence and clean up hazardous materials. Anyone with information regarding the meth site is asked to call Munising Police at 387-2275, or the Alger County Sheriff’s Department at 387-7027.
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Looking for a way to get rid of that old beater?

Seeing no other options to help get her brother Abdullah's family out of Syria and to safety, Teema Kurdi sent him money to get them onto a smuggler's boat that would take them to Greece.

"We actually would say we encouraged them to go, because his brother made it, and there was no other hope," he told NPR's Rachel Martin in an emotional interview. "We don't see the war ending in Syria; life in Turkey is hopeless."

Editor's Note: This report contains a racial slur.

A new play reveals some little-known history about the land that became New York City's Central Park: People used to live there.

Beginning in 1825, about 300 people — mainly free African-Americans — lived in a village that spanned a portion of the park's 843 acres in Manhattan, between 82nd and 89th streets, east of Central Park West. It was called Seneca Village.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It was a sad day in Houston, as the family, friends and colleagues of Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth attended his funeral Friday. In an apparent attempt to ease their grief, a couple who were at the gas station where Goforth was killed came forward Friday to tell the family that after he was attacked, they had sat with the deputy to wait for help.

By now, you've probably seen the photo of Aylan Kurdi, the 3-year-old refugee from Syria who died with his 5-year-old brother and mother after their small rubber boat capsized on its way to Greece. You might remember his Velcro shoes. His red shirt. His lifeless body lying face down in the sand.

It's that time of year when some gardeners and tomato-coveting shoppers face a vexing question: What on earth am I going to do with all these tomatoes I grew (or bought)?

A select few up to their elbows in tomatoes may have an additional quandary: How am I going to prepare different kinds of tomatoes to honor their unique qualities?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Review: 'Poison Season,' Destroyer

6 hours ago
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The musician we're going to hear about goes by the name Destroyer. You might expect heavy metal. Well, not exactly.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MIDNIGHT MEET THE RAIN")

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