Lead Stories

Justice Antonin Scalia, Known For Biting Dissents, Dies At 79

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, perhaps the leading voice of uncompromising conservatism on the nation's highest court, was found dead Saturday, Chief Justice John Roberts has confirmed. Scalia, who had been staying at a luxury ranch in West Texas, was 79 years old."On behalf of the Court and retired Justices, I am saddened to report that our colleague Justice Antonin Scalia has passed away," Roberts said in a statement. "He was an extraordinary individual and jurist, admired and...
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Two-vehicle accident in Sands Township

SANDS TOWNSHIP, MI-- A Gwinn woman was taken to the hospital after she was involved in a crash on M-553 Thursday morning. Marquette County Sheriff’s deputies say the incident happened around 9:10 a.m. just north of County Road 480 in Sands Township. Amanda Buck, 25, of Gwinn was northbound when her pickup started sliding sideways across the southbound lane. The truck’s passenger side was struck by a vehicle driven by Su Hausmann, 68, of Gwinn. Buck was taken to UPHS Marquette for treatment of...
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In terms of the ideological balance of the Supreme Court, the death of Justice Antonin Scalia is monumental. With Scalia, the court had four reliable conservative votes and in Justice Kennedy, the court had a conservative swing vote.

That lead to many decisions that were decided by a razor thin 5-to-4 margin. To gauge Scalia's importance, we dug through the Supreme Court Database and found that during Obama's presidency, 53 cases have been decided by a 5-4 majority that included Scalia.

On a frigid morning in Washington, the flags fluttered at half staff. Under a cloudless sky, the Supreme Court building looked brilliant.

A small American flag was draped at the foot of the steps and mourners placed flowers and candles to pay tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia.

Bill Follett, a trial judge from California, was visiting Washington with his family. He stood right in front of the memorial for a moment.

Antonin Scalia was just one of six Roman Catholic justices on the Supreme Court, but in his devotion to the faith he was second to none. Neighbors saw him and his wife Maureen worshipping frequently at St. Catherine of Siena in Great Falls, Va., a church Scalia was said to favor because it was one of the few Catholic parishes in the Washington, D.C., area that still offered a Latin mass.

At an open-air mass in a poor, crime-ridden suburb of Mexico City, Pope Francis excoriated inequality, corruption and the temptation of wealth.

The pontiff called out the rich and elite of Mexico, Reuters writes:

"Decrying 'a society of the few and for the few,' he denounced deep inequality and the vanity and pride of those who consider themselves a cut above the rest.

Just a few days ago, major world powers announced they would work on a plan to stop hostilities in Syria within a week. The proposed agreement would be temporary, and would fall short of a full cease-fire.

Instead, the nations involved have agreed "to encourage their proxies to cease hostilities in a week with an eye to a more permanent cease-fire down the road," NPR's Michele Kelemen explained Friday.

Since then, fighting on the ground has only intensified.

The Appointment Clause of the Constitution (Article II, Section 2, clause 2) states the President "shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint ... Judges of the supreme Court."

President Obama says he plans to pick a Supreme Court nominee following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, setting up a confrontation with Republicans who control the Senate.

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Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And as promised, NPR's Sam Sanders is with us now from South Carolina.

Good morning, Sam.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: Hey. How are you?

The Goats and Soda team is playing a game, and one of us pulls out a bright red card with this line: "Angelina Jolie will now be a special envoy for ____."

Each team member shuffles through a handful of white cards and picks an answer to fill in the blank. This is what we get:

"Explaining that Chad is a country, not a person"

"China!"

"Antimalarial-induced hallucinations"

"George Clooney's wife"

Now comes the fun part. Which card do you choose?

English Football's Rising Team

7 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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