Lead Stories

See a moose? Report it

MARQUETTE, MI-- Department of Natural Resources officials are asking people who come across moose to tell them where they saw it. The DNR has been monitoring the animal since it was reintroduced to the U.P. in the 1980s. Estimates of the population are made through aerial surveys of the moose’s core range in the Western U.P., and observation reports are useful in determining the survey sample area. Residents or visitors who see a moose anywhere in the U.P. are urged to fill out a Moose...
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Marquette County ranks high on best mortgage list

MARQUETTE, MI-- Marquette County is third on the list of top places to get a mortgage in Michigan. That’s according to SmartAsset, a New York financial technology company that recently released its second annual study on the Best Places to Get a Mortgage. The study determines the top markets by comparing the likelihood of mortgage approval by county, as well as mortgage rates, average five-year borrowing costs, and property taxes. Marquette County comes in behind only Leelanau and Livingston...
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Shortly after arriving in Washington for diplomatic meetings this week, Egypt's foreign minister, Sameh Hassan Shoukry, stopped by NPR to speak with Morning Edition's David Greene.

Shoukry, a veteran diplomat and former ambassador to Washington, represents the government of Abdel Hassan el-Sisi, a former general who took power in 2013.

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Why Work From Home Scams Persist

16 minutes ago
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New Hampshire prides itself on surprising people with the outcome of its first-in-the-nation presidential primary. This year, though, the top winner in each party was the candidate the polls had long predicted would win.

So if there was any surprise, it was that the candidates those polls had been smiling on were Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Less than a year ago, neither would have been thought a likely candidate, let alone a plausible winner.

We all know live election coverage is hard — you have to cram a lot of quickly changing information into not a lot of time, and sometimes you forget to eat dinner. MSNBC's Chris Hayes must have been hungry, because here's what he said after Bernie Sanders was announced a winner:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In New Hampshire, the polls have now closed in much of the state, and we are awaiting the results. Officials have been predicting record voter turnout in the state's primary. And here are the voices of just a few of those voters.

Japan is venturing further into the terra incognito of negative interest rates, selling a 10-year government bond that actually costs its purchasers money over time.

In doing so, Japan joins a handful of European countries that have also lowered rates below zero.

The yield on the 10-year note sold by the Bank of Japan dipped to an unprecedented level of negative .05 percent, meaning that anyone who buys it will lose money.

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