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Bruce Crossing resident killed in motorcycle crash

HAIGHT TOWNSHIP, MI-- A man has died in a motorcycle accident in Ontonagon County. Troopers from the Wakefield Post say a motorcyclist was discovered by a passing driver Wednesday around 4 p.m. in an area of trees off of Bond Falls Road near Forest Road 5333 in Haight Township. The driver of the motorcycle—identified as Daryl Neuman, 64, of Bruce Crossing—was pronounced dead at the scene. Troopers say Neuman was wearing a helmet at the time of the crash. The cause of the accident remains...
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Lawsuit wants plans mandated for dealing with big oil spills

TRAVERSE CITY, MI (AP)-- An environmental group is suing the federal government, contending it gives pipeline owners and operators a free pass on developing plans for dealing with oil spills into inland waterways. The suit filed Thursday by the National Wildlife Federation says the federal Oil Pollution Act prohibits operators from handling, storing or transporting oil until their spill response plans get federal approval. The plans are supposed to make sure enough resources are available to...
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Oktoberfest 2015

"Laughing Whitefish" Printing Plate from John Voelker's 1965 book

Looking for a way to get rid of that old beater?

After a few days of dry conditions, rain is once again in the forecast for South Carolina.

Torrential rains — in some parts, 20 inches in two days — have caused historic flooding in the state, which is still recovering. Parts of I-95, for example, are still closed.

Weather.com reports that the good news is that the new storms aren't forecast to drop torrential rains:

At least 30 people have been killed and 125 injured in two bomb explosions, reportedly targeting a peace rally in central Ankara, Turkey. The explosions occurred near the capital's train station early Saturday morning.

The BBC's Mark Lowen tells our Newscast unit:

How They Spent Their Global Summer Vacation

1 hour ago

How did you spend your summer vacation?

If you're studying global affairs, international policy, intercultural studies or public health in the developing world, summer vacation often means fieldwork far from campus dorms (and familiar comforts).

We asked three graduate students in international studies programs to tell us how they spent their global summer vacations.

Who: Tatenda Yemeke, a native of Zimbabwe, working toward a master's degree in the Duke University Global Health program

If you've never tasted a pawpaw, now is the moment.

For just a few weeks every year in September and October, this native, mango-like fruit falls from trees, everywhere from Virginia to Kansas and many points westward. (We discovered them several years back along the banks of the Potomac River when we ran into some kayakers who were snacking on them.)

Since the diplomatic thaw with Cuba was first announced last December, the Obama administration has moved aggressively to ease restrictions on travel and trade. Looser rules were announced in January, and restrictions were eased further in September. But the Commerce and Treasury Departments can only go so far, unless Congress votes to lift the legal embargo.

Here we go: some international soccer news that doesn't involve FIFA President Sepp Blatter.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.



And we're going to hear now from one of the other leaders of Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet. Her name is Wided Bouchamaoui. She's president of the Tunisian employers union, and she joins us from Tunis.

Chaos ensued in the halls of Congress Thursday when Rep. Kevin McCarthy unexpectedly took himself out of the running to replace John Boehner as speaker of the House.

The reason for the pandemonium and, yes, even tears: No one knows where this goes from here.

Here are the four likely ways it gets resolved:

A Scottish nurse who recovered from Ebola in January has been medevaced from Glasgow to London in a Royal Air Force C-130 Hercules transport plane specially equipped for infection control.

Doctors say Pauline Cafferkey is suffering "an unusual late complication" from her previous Ebola infection. They note that "Pauline previously had the Ebola virus and this is therefore not a new infection."

Over the summer, the Texas Forensic Science Commission, which sets standards for physical evidence in state courts, came to an unsettling conclusion: There was something wrong with how state labs were analyzing DNA evidence.

It seemed the labs were using an outdated protocol for calculating the probability of DNA matches in "mixtures"; that is, crime scene samples that contain genetic material from several people. It may have affected thousands of cases going back to 1999.