Elections

LANSING, MI (AP)--   Michigan's elections board has deadlocked on whether to let ballot drive organizers more easily prove that voter signatures collected outside a six-month window should still count.  

The Board of State Canvassers voted 2-2 Thursday on a proposal spurred by a group gathering signatures to legalize marijuana for recreational use.

Democrats supported the change while Republicans opposed it.

The following is a list of proposals on the ballot for counties in the Public Radio 90 listening area (no uncontested races are included):

ALGER COUNTY

Autrain Township, Grand Island Township, City of Munising, Munising Township:

LANSING, MI (AP)--   Organizers of a long-shot campaign to recall Governor Rick Snyder from office for his handling of Flint's water crisis are starting to collect signatures. 

Once the petition drive starts Sunday, the groups will have 60 days to gather about 790,000 valid voter signatures. That's far more signatures and a shorter time window than is allotted for ballot initiatives.

MADISON, WI (AP)--   The Wisconsin Senate has given final approval to a bill allowing Wisconsin voters to register online.  

Thirty states plus the District of Columbia already offer online registration. Under the Wisconsin bill, voters would need a valid driver's license or state ID card to register. The bill also would create officials who can register people at the polls as well as at nursing homes and during in-person absentee voting. The proposal would eliminate special registration deputies who help voters register at events and go door-to-door.

Sanders, Trump rack up Michigan primary wins

Mar 9, 2016

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Michigan voters stunned the political world by handing Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders a surprise Democratic primary victory over former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The win means the two Democrats will split Michigan’s national convention delegates.  

Sanders released this statement following the Michigan results:

fox2detroit.com

MARQUETTE, MI--   Tuesday is primary day in Michigan. 

Residents head to the polls to vote for who they’d like to see nominated for president in their party.  They will choose either a Democrat or Republican ballot.

The list of candidates on the Republican ballot is as follows:

LANSING, MI (AP)--   A state board has rejected petitions to recall Michigan Governor Rick Snyder over his handling of Flint's lead-contaminated water. 

The Board of State Canvassers rejected the petitions Thursday, 4-0. The board says the reasons for a recall must be clear and factual, under Michigan law. If they're not, no one can gather signatures to force a recall election.

Flint resident Quincy Murphy wants to recall Snyder for "failing to protect the health and safety" of the citizens of Flint. Snyder attorney John Pirich says that's opinion, not fact.

LANSING, MI (AP)--   Republican Secretary of State Ruth Johnson says it's "imperative" that voters be able to cast an absentee ballot for any reason now that the straight-party voting option has been eliminated from ballots. 

Johnson told The Associated Press on Wednesday that enacting no-reason absentee voting legislation would alleviate local clerks' fears of longer lines caused by people needing more time to vote. Governor Rick Snyder endorsed the bill Tuesday while approving the removal of the straight-ticket option.

www.quadratin.com.mx

LANSING, MI (AP)--   A fourth Democratic presidential candidate will appear on Michigan's March 8 primary ballot.

The Board of State Canvassers last week approved petitions filed by California businessman Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente. He is the only Republican or Democratic candidate to qualify by filing voter signatures.

Other candidates qualified because they were on the Secretary of State's list of people generally advocated by the national news media to be potential candidates.

LANSING, MI (AP)--   Michigan voters who with a single mark can vote Democratic or Republican for every partisan office on the ballot may no longer have the option in 2016. 

Republicans who control the Legislature want to make Michigan the latest state to eliminate straight-ticket, or straight-party, voting. It's still allowed in 10 states but has been abolished by nine others in the last 20 years.

Pages